Moving mountains.

Well, not exactly moving mountains, but hooking, reverse hooking, and making color changes and additions.  I thought that the Grizzly Peak mountain area on this rug would be a snap to do, but it was not.  Often, when hooking a new design, it’s necessary to get a bit of it hooked and then step back and give it a critical look. 

One of the excellent design suggestions that I gleaned from the workshop that Susan Feller did here at Crow's Foot Farm, was to think of these four elements when color planning: light; bright; dark; dull.

I chose to do the sunflowers in a more low-key yellow palette than the usual bright yellow flowers.  That meant the mountains behind them had to be a dull color to keep them in the distance.  I had a perfect dull grey-aqua plaid wool to use and I added the purples, darker green-blues, and a lighter tan with a blue and brown subtle plaid for the highlighted peaks.  After looking that over, I decided to add the dark blue line to separate the green foreground from the mountain. 

I knew I wanted the sky to be a real blue.  On a sunny day, the sky in Oregon is incredibly blue.  After getting half of the sky hooked, I decided to add the darker blue green edge at the top of the mountain, which I think it needs. 

The border will come next.  This rug, which will be along the side of a bed, really needs a good border.  Something simple and a bit bold to contain the design and anchor the rug.  Some of the sunflower petals will overlap the border to create interest.

Although this rug hasn’t been easy to hook, the journey has been fun.  I have enjoyed the trial and error of the process and I'm sure there will be more changes before it's finished.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the landscape of Oregon.

A bit more of the sky to do and then on to the border.

A bit more of the sky to do and then on to the border.

The color of the back porch bench is similar to the mountain range.

The color of the back porch bench is similar to the mountain range.