Rug binding 101.

There are many ways to bind hooked rugs and I’ve tried a number of them. But once I ditched the twill tape and starting using cotton clothesline cord, I found the technique that suits me best.

I love the weight of the cord around the edges.  It gives the rug a good “plop” when thrown down on the floor.  I use cord for all my rugs, even those that hang on the wall.

Another plus for this technique is that the bound edge looks the same on the front and the back.

After steam blocking the rug I lay it right side up and trim the excess linen to 1 ½”.  I then fold the cut edge in to the outer row of loops and iron it down.  Then the following steps are shown in the photos below.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a neatly bound rug.

The completed rug in situ.

The completed rug in situ.

After pressing the excess linen toward the loops, I lay the cord on it and begin basting it in place.

After pressing the excess linen toward the loops, I lay the cord on it and begin basting it in place.

This rug has a curvy border.  On the inward curves I had to clip the linen and add some Fray-stop to the cut.  This allows the rug to lay flat.  If I didn’t use the cord, this area would be almost impossible to whip with yarn.

This rug has a curvy border. On the inward curves I had to clip the linen and add some Fray-stop to the cut. This allows the rug to lay flat. If I didn’t use the cord, this area would be almost impossible to whip with yarn.

I like to use Alafosslopi yarn, which is a heavy yarn with a loose twist.  There are many kinds of wool yarn that can be used for whipping.  I used two different purples together to add interest.

I like to use Alafosslopi yarn, which is a heavy yarn with a loose twist. There are many kinds of wool yarn that can be used for whipping. I used two different purples together to add interest.

I used two different purples for the purple areas.  One is a red-purple and the other is a blue-purple, so I used a strand of red-purple yarn with a strand of blue-purple yarn for whipping.

I used two different purples for the purple areas. One is a red-purple and the other is a blue-purple, so I used a strand of red-purple yarn with a strand of blue-purple yarn for whipping.

Colors of spring.

I know that spring is definitely on the way when I go to the Woolwrights’ hook-in in Lancaster, PA.  Those ladies do a superb job putting on this annual event.  There were many wonderful vendors and lots of rug hookers sharing their beautiful rugs.  The Magdalena Rug Hookers, the group I’m in,  had a nice turnout and did some impressive shopping and hooking!

I took my Harvest Moon rug and whipped most of the border.  I was so happy to find Lopi yarn to match the fuschia wool that I dyed.  I will finish it up this week and fix the back of the rug for hanging.  Then when I host Breakfast Club on March 29th, I will exchange this rug for a fabulous mosaic of pumpkins by Jo Alexander.  I cannot wait!  I will share photos when the exchange takes place.

I have finished my week of animal wifery for the neighbors’ 28 hens and 13 guinea fowl.  I have a refrigerator filled with the most colorful eggs!  They are destined for several quiches and the rest will be made into delicious pickled beet eggs.  What a treat!

I’m still pondering what rug I’ll do next as I work on a super-secret rug for a group project.  There is an idea percolating in the back of my brain.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a room full of rug hookers and a henhouse filled with egg layers. 

Happy spring!

My favorite way to bind a rug. Roll linen over cotton clothesline, baste in place, and whip with yarn.

My favorite way to bind a rug. Roll linen over cotton clothesline, baste in place, and whip with yarn.

Yummy colors everywhere at the hook-in!

Yummy colors everywhere at the hook-in!

Look at these colors! Rich brown, pale brown, light blue, light green, olive green and white!

Look at these colors! Rich brown, pale brown, light blue, light green, olive green and white!