Rug binding 101.

There are many ways to bind hooked rugs and I’ve tried a number of them. But once I ditched the twill tape and starting using cotton clothesline cord, I found the technique that suits me best.

I love the weight of the cord around the edges.  It gives the rug a good “plop” when thrown down on the floor.  I use cord for all my rugs, even those that hang on the wall.

Another plus for this technique is that the bound edge looks the same on the front and the back.

After steam blocking the rug I lay it right side up and trim the excess linen to 1 ½”.  I then fold the cut edge in to the outer row of loops and iron it down.  Then the following steps are shown in the photos below.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a neatly bound rug.

The completed rug in situ.

The completed rug in situ.

After pressing the excess linen toward the loops, I lay the cord on it and begin basting it in place.

After pressing the excess linen toward the loops, I lay the cord on it and begin basting it in place.

This rug has a curvy border.  On the inward curves I had to clip the linen and add some Fray-stop to the cut.  This allows the rug to lay flat.  If I didn’t use the cord, this area would be almost impossible to whip with yarn.

This rug has a curvy border. On the inward curves I had to clip the linen and add some Fray-stop to the cut. This allows the rug to lay flat. If I didn’t use the cord, this area would be almost impossible to whip with yarn.

I like to use Alafosslopi yarn, which is a heavy yarn with a loose twist.  There are many kinds of wool yarn that can be used for whipping.  I used two different purples together to add interest.

I like to use Alafosslopi yarn, which is a heavy yarn with a loose twist. There are many kinds of wool yarn that can be used for whipping. I used two different purples together to add interest.

I used two different purples for the purple areas.  One is a red-purple and the other is a blue-purple, so I used a strand of red-purple yarn with a strand of blue-purple yarn for whipping.

I used two different purples for the purple areas. One is a red-purple and the other is a blue-purple, so I used a strand of red-purple yarn with a strand of blue-purple yarn for whipping.

Ready to bind.

Somehow I managed to finish hooking my I Love My OCD rug.  The dog population was pretty good most of the past week, allowing me time in the studio.  Some days are better than others and I’m looking forward to taking Leo to his Manners Class, which begins in a couple of weeks. 

The photo below of my latest rug doesn’t show the irregular curvy border.  I can’t wait to start binding this [yes, I actually do love to bind rugs!]  The rug is about 32” x 39”, so I’ll have to stand on a chair to get a full photo of it.  In the meantime, I’ll take photos as I bind it to show my process.  I have one favorite way to bind and I’m sticking to it! 

I’m still pondering how to design the next piece in my Mother Earth Speaks series.  It will depict the ocean with plastic flotsam.  Such a sad state of affairs for the Earth’s oceans. 

As some of you know, I’m in the Magdalena Rug Hookers here in Perry County PA.  I’m also in a three-woman splinter group called, Maggie’s Meyvns.  We Meyvns are each planning on hooking a rug about one of our strong woman heroes, Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  I just planned my rug out on paper and I hope to get it on linen soon.  Unfortunately, I can’t show it until all Meyvns have completed their RBG rugs and we have our reveal.  Our reveals usually contain a meal.  We shall see.

The months of July and August will be filled with activities, which will make summer fly by.  I’m already looking forward to autumn.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the hooked rug finishing process. 

The center area of I Love My OCD  32” x 39”.  Hooked with #8 and #8.5 cuts of wool cloth on linen.

The center area of I Love My OCD 32” x 39”. Hooked with #8 and #8.5 cuts of wool cloth on linen.

Here’s the tub of noodles after finishing the rug.  I didn’t use them all up, but I made a good dent.

Here’s the tub of noodles after finishing the rug. I didn’t use them all up, but I made a good dent.

I re-sorted the leftover noodles by color and put them back in their 2 gallon bags. This only took me 15-20 minutes, for those of you who think I’m crazy!

I re-sorted the leftover noodles by color and put them back in their 2 gallon bags. This only took me 15-20 minutes, for those of you who think I’m crazy!

First chaos, then order.

I’m having fun with my stash-busting, I Love My OCD rug.  I grabbed an empty tub and put huge handfuls of noodles in it.  The variety of cuts and colors should be enough to create an interesting rug.  Every other section is hooked with two purple plaids in a #8.5 cut.  If this doesn’t decrease my stash, I don’t know what will, but I guess I’ll have to wait and see.

There is one little thing that is tickling my OCD, and that is the fact that if I don’t use up most of the noodles in the bin, I’ll have to separate them by color and put them back in their 2-gallon bags.  That task won’t actually be a bad thing.  The next project will be one for my Mother Earth Speaks series, so I will have to clean up my studio before starting that one.

In spite of many on-the-fly changes, this rug is hooking up quickly and I look forward to placing it in front of my studio door.  I’m sure that there will be some questions such as, “Whose initials are those?” 

I just received a brand-new rug hooking book to give away.  It’s a fun one, so be sure to tune in next week when I’ll tell you about it and start the giveaway.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in my latest free-wheeling rug hooking project!

Fun shapes and fun colors make a fun rug!

Fun shapes and fun colors make a fun rug!

A tub full of noodles/worms.  What do you call them?

A tub full of noodles/worms. What do you call them?