Saving time?

Right now I have three super-secret hooking projects that I can’t share.  That’s always a problem when it comes to writing my blog. I seem to be in a slump without a new rug to design and hook.  I had quite a slump a year or so ago and it took a while to dig myself out of it.  Perhaps the Woolwrights’ hook-in this coming weekend will help to inspire me.  All the wool!  The colors!  The rug show!  See? I’m feeling better already.

I have been looking for signs of spring in spite of the ongoing snowstorms. I’m sure there are daffodils and crocus [croci?] pushing up through the cold earth. It’s just hard to find them under the snow.  I actually did have an egg from my old hens, which always amazes me.  I don’t know who laid it, but of the four hens, the youngest one might be seven years old.  That is optimistic determination and a sure sign of spring.

I seem go through a slump every year when “they” turn the clocks ahead.  Daylight Saving Time.  Does it save time?  I know I’m in a tiny minority of people, who don’t like this time change.  I don’t think I personally know anyone who agrees with me.  I don’t mean to dampen anyone’s excitement for the longer daylight hours and warmer temps.  Go for it!  Get outside and revel in it!

In the meantime, I’ll light some candles and leave offerings to my Muse.  She always comes through for me in her own good time.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and some of it is hiding under the snow.

Who laid this hopeful sign of spring? Elphaba? Tillie? Charlotte? PeepPeep?

Who laid this hopeful sign of spring? Elphaba? Tillie? Charlotte? PeepPeep?

Asking my Muse for inspiration.

Asking my Muse for inspiration.

 

A rug to dye for.

Some of you might have heard me say, “I don’t want to dye!”  I’m not sure why I don’t like to dye wool.  Maybe it’s too much like cooking, which I’m not crazy about either.  But this Harvest Moon rug that I’m hooking for a friend, who loves rich color, needed a deep magenta/fuschia/raspberry [not sure what to call this color] border.  I knew I had to bite the bullet and dye some wool.

I used Ingrid Hieronymous’ recipe for the perfect color and made up a batch of dye.  To make a long and tedious story short, I had to dye this same yard of wool FOUR TIMES to get the intensity of color I wanted.  But in the end it was worth it.  The hooking is finished.. Now comes the binding, which I enjoy doing. I might take it to the Woolwrights’ hook-in in a couple of weeks and do it there.

As I was bemoaning this dye job, I amused myself by thinking of the interesting terms that we rug hookers use. We strip, bind, whip, and dye.  Sounds like one of the true crime podcasts I listen to.

I am without a next rug to design and hook, which I can blog about.  I’m sure something will pop into my imagination.  Hopefully, I won’t have to dye any wool for it.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a dye job that finally comes out right.

Harvest Moon 22” x 39”.  All ready for the binding and whipping!

Harvest Moon 22” x 39”. All ready for the binding and whipping!

Talented friends.

I’m fortunate to have many talented and artistic friends. They never cease to amaze and inspire me.  Some of them make unique jewelry, knit beautiful garments, do creative embroidery, hook wonderful rugs, and create mosaic masterpieces. 

My friend, Josephine [Jo] Alexander is a mosaic artist, whose pieces take my breath away.  I love glass and have been tempted to take classes from her, but I’m resisting adding another craft to my repertoire.  I have a studio filled with wool. Can you imagine it equally filled with glass?!

Jo Alexander’s mosaic business is called, Grandmother Moon Mosaics.  Do yourself a favor and check her out on Facebook. She is prolific and extremely talented.  I am very excited that she and I are doing a trade.  To be honest, I think I’ll get the best of this deal.

I have begun hooking my design, Harvest Moon, for Jo.  I love hooking pumpkins, because orange is my favorite Creative Energy color.  One pumpkin is a brighter orange, with magenta highlights, which I love to add to orange.  The next pumpkin is more of a yellow color with a few dark teal highlights. The third pumpkin will be a blue gourd, I think.  I’ll have to see how it looks behind the barn owl.

I purchased a beautiful piece of Jan Cole /The Wool n’ Gardener’s spot-dyed deep turquoise wool just for this rug.  Jo loves rich colors and the turquoise behind the orange will be perfect.  I can’t wait to hook further to see how this all will play out.  The vines and leaves will be hooked in a variety of yellow-greens and I think the outer border will be a deep magenta, which I will dye. 

Oh, and the mosaic that Jo is doing for me also has pumpkins. And a crow. How perfect!

This new project has given me new energy during these snowy, quiet days.  I hope your winter is progressing well and giving you time for creativity, too.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the vibrant colors of a new hooking project.

Oh! These colors!  The start of my Harvest Moon piece.

Oh! These colors! The start of my Harvest Moon piece.

Color closeup.

Color closeup.

A winner and a rug finish.

Thanks for all the entries and comments for the book giveaway.  The lucky winner of Rug Hooking Journeys: Finding the Maker in the Rug by Tamara Pavich [©2019 Ampry Publishing LLC / Rig Hooking] is Lisa, who said, “I’m new to rug hooking and am completely taken with it. I love looking at others’ creations for inspiration. Thanks so much for this wonderful gift. Here’s hoping.”   Congratulations, Lisa, I’ll contact you for your mailing address and send this wonderful new book your way.

We had more snow here in Pennsylvania this past week and then some icy rain, so things were a bit dicey.  I stayed home as much as possible, which gave me a bit of cabin fever.  The good news is that I finished my piece titled, Looming in Greenland, the third installment in my Mother Earth Speaks series.  I have trimmed, folded, and basted my usual cotton clothesline into the edges, but I still need to whip the edges with yarn, which I will do at the Woolwrights’ hook-in next month.

Before I continue with my Mother Earth Speaks series, I want to hook my pattern, Harvest Moon, which I am doing as a trade with a friend, who is a very talented mosaic artist.  More on all this next week with some beginning progress on that rug.

I’m having a visit from my friend, who now lives in Connecticut.  We plan lots of things to do while she’s here, so it’s been fun. That has helped with the cabin fever.

I hope winter is bringing you time to be inside with your rug hooking project and a warm beverage on these cold days.  Look for signs if spring, which can surprise us when we least expect it.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the next new project.

Lisa is the winner of this great new book!

Lisa is the winner of this great new book!

Looming in Greenland designed and hooked by Karen Larsen. All finished but for the yarn whipping.

Looming in Greenland designed and hooked by Karen Larsen. All finished but for the yarn whipping.

Jump in the dye pot - BOOK GIVEAWAY

I have a brand new book for today’s giveaway.  It’s Rug Hooking Journeys: Finding the Maker in the Rug by Tamara Pavich [©2019 Ampry Publishing LLC / Rug Hooking].

This book is filled with rugs and their artists and is a visual treasure trove to inspire all rug hookers and designers.  There are artist interviews, which share the process and inspiration of many well-known and excellent rug hookers.  You will know many of them and others will be a surprise. In all cases, their designs and stories will delight you!

Words are inadequate to describe this book, which is really something to be seen and enjoyed. There are many color photos to get your inspiration flowing.

So, with that in mind, if you would like a chance to win this book, here is the way to get your name in the lucky dye pot.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a book filled with inspiration.

BOOK GIVEAWAY:  I am excited to have a give-away copy of Rug Hooking Journeys: Finding the Maker in the Rug by Tamara Pavich [© 2019 Ampry Publishing LLC and presented by Rug Hooking].  To get your name in the drawing, please leave a comment on this blog post on my website.  [Below this blog post is the teeny tiny word “comment/s”. Click on that to open a space to type in your comment.] Be sure to sign in to leave your comment, so I will have your email address to contact you if you win.  [Your email address will not be used for any other purpose].  The drawing will be held on Sunday, February 17th at Noon [EST].  I will announce the lucky winner in my blog on Monday, February 18th, 2019.  Good luck!

Get your name in the dye pot for a chance to win this excellent new book!

Get your name in the dye pot for a chance to win this excellent new book!

Only The Shadow knows.

Groundhog Day, this past Saturday, brought some opposing prognostications about the arrival of spring.  In either case it will be six weeks until spring begins, but it’s a fun tradition.  Punxatawney Phil, a PA celebrity, predicted that spring weather would arrive early.  That’s good news.  However, my hen, Charlotte, saw her shadow, so she’s predicting six more weeks of winter.  Only time will tell.

This past week consisted of cleaning and straightening my studio.  My first priority was organizing my paper patterns from which I make my hooked rug patterns on linen backing.  Some of my “working patterns” [as opposed to the original drawings that I keep in separate folders] needed to be redrawn.  Having worked in a library many years ago, I also made sure the patterns were put back in alphabetical order.

Studio cleanup didn’t take as long as I anticipated, so I did get some hooking done on my Looming in Greenland piece.  I finished hooking the grey and threatening sky.  I don’t enjoy hooking in straight lines, but it seemed a good way to make a visual separation of the sky and the iceberg. I hope to have this piece finished in a week or two.  My next piece will be a lot more colorful, which will be fun.

I hope your weather is a bit milder after the cold snap we just had.  I’m going to start looking for signs of spring, how about you?

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the anticipation of warmer weather ahead.

Charlotte saw her shadow, but she wasn’t frightened at all.

Charlotte saw her shadow, but she wasn’t frightened at all.

Come into my studio while it’s clean and tidy.

Come into my studio while it’s clean and tidy.

A brief  neat and tidy view of the studio.  I’ve already dragged out some of these tubs.

A brief neat and tidy view of the studio. I’ve already dragged out some of these tubs.

This and that.

This past week was a quiet one in which I did some knitting, hooking, sewing, cooking and sitting by the wood stove. I do love the cold days of winter, which encourage all of the aforementioned activities.

My Looming in Greenland hooked piece, which is in my Mother Earth Speaks series, is coming along slowly.  Is it the giant iceberg that is causing a bit of obstruction?  I’m using spot dyed wool in values of a green-blue for the berg.  I’m not sure I like it, but I shall continue hooking and see how it comes out.  I’ve had lots of practice “reverse hooking”, so I might have to do some of that. Patience is a virtue when hooking a rug.

I’m also knitting some socks, which I love to do.  They might be a gift.  I’ve knitted many pairs of socks and wear them all the time. When one sock gets a hole in it, I admit that I toss it instead of mending it. I find that a mend on socks [at least the way that I mend] makes a lumpy area and is uncomfortable to walk on.  So, you might just see me wearing mismatched socks.  Happily, with age comes a letting go of what’s considered “normal”.

A beautiful bit of spring has bloomed in the house this week.  My friend, Pat, gave me an amaryllis bulb and I potted it the week before Thanksgiving. It is just now blooming!  Is that normal or did I have it in a window that isn’t quite sunny enough? I’m not much of a gardener, I admit.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a home filled with projects and a hint of spring.

Looming in Greenland is a work in progress.  There may be many changes ahead.

Looming in Greenland is a work in progress. There may be many changes ahead.

I love knitting socks. My “signature” is using different yarn for the toes.

I love knitting socks. My “signature” is using different yarn for the toes.

Heavy blooms of this slow-blooming amaryllis.

Heavy blooms of this slow-blooming amaryllis.

Why rug hookers love snow.

We finally got our first snow since before Yule, when winter actually began.  It’s only an inch, but it’s plenty enough to clean hooked rugs.

If you’re a rug hooker, and you live where it snows, you have probably cleaned and refreshed your rugs this way.  For the uninitiated, here’s how it’s done.

I carried my rug out past where the dogs do their business and threw it on the snow topside down.  Flipping it over, I admired the perfect amount of snow clinging to it.  This snow was the perfect fluffy kind.  Then I used my favorite rug broom to gently sweep off the snow., which gets rid of any dust, dirt and dog hair.  I hung the rug inside to dry completely before putting it down on the floor again.  Easy peasy!

A word about my broom, which is pictured below.  I’m fortunate to live near a talented broom maker, Tony Campbell.  I have bought many brooms from him and each is unique with different handles, length of broomcorn, and stitching.  He’s a master and uses antique broom-making equipment.  Some of the whiskbrooms I have bought, have turkey feet or deer antlers on top.  The one I used to sweep the snow off my rug has long, soft broomcorn at the business end and a long handle fashioned from an amazing stalk from some Sweet Annie that he grows.  He must feed his crop some magic vitamins to get the stalks so thick and strong!

This past weekend I spent a fun day with some of the Magdalenas [my rug hooking group] at a hooking retreat.  There were some newbie hookers and it’s always exciting to see them get into this fun and creative fiber art. 

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the bounty of winter snow.

Step one:  throw rug face down on the snow.

Step one: throw rug face down on the snow.

Flip the rug over and admire the beautiful snow on it!  Start sweeping the snow off.

Flip the rug over and admire the beautiful snow on it! Start sweeping the snow off.

All finished.  Admire the clean bright colors!  Hang inside to dry.

All finished. Admire the clean bright colors! Hang inside to dry.

Looking back and looking ahead.

Ever since I was old enough to understand what New Year’s Eve is all about, it has always brought about a feeling of sadness. Maybe I don’t feel ready to start a new year, maybe the ending year hasn’t been great, or maybe it’s a reminder that I’m a year older.  I’m not sure exactly why this feeling descends upon me.  The euphoric celebrations always feel forced.

This year, I’m determined to look forward to 2019 with positivity. With that in mind, I sat with my sketchbook this past week and worked on a design for a project in which I am honored to be invited to participate. I had a general idea of what I want to depict, but how to do it is another thing altogether.  I sat and contemplated, and jotted down the feelings that I want the design to impart.  I think I am well on my way to a design that will be meaningful.  This hooked piece will not be worked on for months yet, which gives me lots of time to tweak my design.  This gives me hope for the year ahead.

I also have a couple of designs already on linen to hook.  One will be very monochromatic and the other one will be filled with rich, jewel tones.  I have a substantial stash of incredible wool, hooking tools, a comfortable chair, and music in my hooking studio. These also give me hope for a good year ahead.

I hope you all have a positive year ahead. Thank you all for your friendship, your comments, and your pattern purchases.  Let’s all make 2019 the best it can be!

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in counting one’s blessings of all kinds.

Snow Angel. Wool cloth strips on unbleached primitive linen foundation.

Snow Angel. Wool cloth strips on unbleached primitive linen foundation.

Merry Christmas to you and yours.

This holiday time has been a busy and fun one, and isn’t over yet, so today I will just wish you all a Merry Christmas and a happy and healthy holiday season and New Year ahead.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in this season, filled with many delights to see, hear, taste and experience. I hope you are savoring them all.

Night Visitor 24” x 18” The tomte is one of my favorite winter figures.  [Photo by Impact Xpozures]

Night Visitor 24” x 18” The tomte is one of my favorite winter figures. [Photo by Impact Xpozures]

Not Quite White  27” x 21”. This design is in the new book, Rug Hooking Through the Year, [©2018 Ampry Publishing LLC / Rug Hooking]

Not Quite White 27” x 21”. This design is in the new book, Rug Hooking Through the Year, [©2018 Ampry Publishing LLC / Rug Hooking]

Northern Lights à la Emily Carr,  24” x 18”

Northern Lights à la Emily Carr, 24” x 18”

Fruitcake oddballs and woolly weirdness.

A friend came bearing fruitcake on Saturday for our annual Fruitcake Nosh.  We are the only two people that we know, who love this seasonal delicacy. Well, fruitcake can’t exactly be called delicate, because it’s heavily laden with fruits and nuts. I added brandy to mine. We had tea, talked about a wide variety of things and shared our sweet treat. Two happy oddballs.

I made some good progress on the Waxing Crescent pattern this past week. I didn’t hook every day, because of holiday-related projects and distractions, but the background is hooking up quickly. I’m using the perfect night sky wool that I bought a long time ago from The Wool Studio.  The wool is called After Hours, but I doubt Rebecca has any of it, unless she had it re-milled.  I’m determined to use up my wool, but the bins seem to remain as full as ever.  That’s really not a bad thing, just weird.

The weather has gotten COLD, which isn’t news.  It does mean that I have to plan ahead when I want to spend the day hooking in my studio, because I have to put on the heater in the morning.  I love it there listening to music as I hook away, stopping occasionally to look out the windows at the rural beauty and maybe the neighbors’ guinea fowl foraging for insects. 

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the quietude of the season.

Good progress on Waxing Crescent.

Good progress on Waxing Crescent.

Seeing double.

I finally got back to the hooking frame this past week.  I started with the barn owl on the Waxing Crescent pattern I’m hooking for a friend.  For some reason, the face was giving me trouble, causing me to pull out and re-hook areas.  I always download an image of the animal or other subject I’m hooking, so I can study the colors, etc.  I’m not trying to create a photographically perfect image, but rather an interpretation.

As I was fussing with it, a lightbulb went on over my head and I remembered another pattern that I have on linen, which is in the I-need-to-be-hooked queue. That one is Harvest Moon and it also has a barn owl.  Doing them both at the same time will save me from trying to remember how I hooked the first owl.

As always, my noodle bin is providing much of the wool that I’m using. As hard as I try to use up my noodles, they remain the same. Too bad that doesn’t work with money.

Meanwhile, there are Yule gifts that need to be made. They’re fun to make and offer a nice diversion from my usual obsessive rug hooking.  I tend to get lost for hours in my studio and when I look up, the afternoon is already darkening.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the variety of creative projects to complete.

Waxing Crescent owl on the left. Harvest Moon owl on the right.

Waxing Crescent owl on the left. Harvest Moon owl on the right.

A week of Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving is a week-long sharing of family time here at Crow’s Foot Farm. Our son, daughter-in-law, and granddaughter, Lucy arrived on Saturday to share in the holiday happenings. There was a bit of melting snow for them to see when they arrived. They don’t get many snowfalls in southern Oregon.

No rug hooking this week as we spend time cooking, baking, doing jigsaw puzzles, running the turkey trot, and relaxing in the rustic countryside of Perry County, PA.

I’m sharing a photograph that our neighbor, Britta Schatz, took four years ago when we had a big beautiful snowstorm at Thanksgiving. I love this photo.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the time spent with family during holiday time.

Thanks to Britta Schatz for this photo taken in 2014. I love the blue snow/purkinje effect.

Thanks to Britta Schatz for this photo taken in 2014. I love the blue snow/purkinje effect.

A book for you, a visit and a pizza for me.

This past week was a fun time with a visit from a friend, who moved to Connecticut a couple of years ago. We did many trips to antique shops, lunches out, lots of laughs, and a bit of wine in the evenings. Don’t ask me to define “a bit”.

During all this, I received many entries from those of you interested in winning the new book, Rug Hooking Through the Year [©2018 Ampry Publishing LLC / Rug Hooking].  Before embarking on her drive home today, Pat drew the name of the book winner out of the dye pot.  The winner is, Chris G., who commented, “What a great book to complete any rug hooker’s library. I would love to have it included in mine. Always looking for great designs and inspiration.”  Congratulations, Chris, I’ll be contacting you for your mailing address and get this brand new book sent your way!

Thank you to everyone who entered the drawing. I appreciate all your comments and wish I could send each of you a book.  The designers included in Rug Hooking Through the Year are ones who will inspire you, so I do hope you will buy a copy for yourself.  I always like to urge rug hookers to join the Rug Hooking Magazine Book Club.  You will get their new books at a reduced price and no shipping costs. It’s definitely worth joining!  Go to the Rug Hooking Magazine website to check out the details.

I also finished a silly little hooked pizza. This is the third pizza I’ve made. What’s up with that?  I’m not sure, but I needed something for the bottom of my wonderful wire basket that holds the wool for whatever project I’m currently working on.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in sharing a book and a visit with a friend.

Pizza in a basket just for fun.

Pizza in a basket just for fun.

Rug Hooking Through the Year.

I’m doing a book giveaway this week.  The book, Rug Hooking Through the Year, is the latest publication by Ampry Publishing LLC/Rug Hooking.  Before I launch into my book review, I must disclose that on the cover is my rug, Magpie Cherry Pie. This book also includes my snowy owl rug titled, Not Quite White.   So, you know I’m going to love this book.

Rug Hooking Through the Year contains 24 favorite projects, which are arranged around the theme of the four seasons.  Fifteen designers are featured with projects for every level of rug hooking experience.  Each designer has included lots of helpful tips about how the rug was designed, wool dyeing and color choice decisions, and there is a line drawing of each design, which can be enlarged and used for one-time personal use.

If you’re looking for ideas for rugs to hook for every season, this book is for you!

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in a new book about hooked rug designers.

BOOK GIVEAWAY:  I am excited to have a give-away copy of Rug Hooking Through the Year [©2018 Ampry Publishing LLC and presented by Rug Hooking].  To get your name in the drawing, please leave a comment on this blog post on my website.  [Below this blog post is the teeny tiny word “comment/s”. Click on that to open a space to type your comment.] Be sure to sign-in to leave your comment, so I will have your email address to contact you if you win.  [Your email address will not be used for any other purpose].  The drawing will be held on Sunday, November 4th at Noon [EST].  I will announce the lucky winner in my blog on Monday, November 5th.

Good luck!

Be sure to leave a comment below to get your name into the dye pot. You might be the winner!

Be sure to leave a comment below to get your name into the dye pot. You might be the winner!

Magpie Cherry Pie hangs in my laundry room.

Magpie Cherry Pie hangs in my laundry room.

Seasonal rugs.

October is my favorite and busiest month of the year. I haven’t spent time at the hooking frame for a couple of weeks, so today I’m featuring my fall and Halloween rug patterns, which are available on the Shop page of my website, if you’re interested. 

It has finally cooled off!  We had a freeze last Thursday night and the back lawn was like a field of diamonds when I let the dogs out early Friday morning. The air was so crisp and clear that I took many deep breaths, which nourished my soul.  I love autumn!

Coming up on Saturday will be the Brandywine Hook-In in Lancaster, PA.  They always put on a spectacular day of hooking, shopping, and camaraderie.  I have a list of spot dyed wools to buy for two of my future rugs and I’m also buying wool for a friend.  I love spending someone else’s money. 

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the crisp clear days and nights of autumn.

The Recipe 24” x 18”

The Recipe 24” x 18”

Stack o’ Jacks 36” x 18”

Stack o’ Jacks 36” x 18”

Waxing Crescent 24” x 18”

Waxing Crescent 24” x 18”

La Hora Del Te 26” x 21”

La Hora Del Te 26” x 21”

Fall Fields 22” x 19”

Fall Fields 22” x 19”

Barn Owl with Moon 24” x 36”

Barn Owl with Moon 24” x 36”

Harvest Moon pattern 22”x 40”

Harvest Moon pattern 22”x 40”

Cross-training.

On a recent Saturday, Humble Stitch, a brand new local yarn and fiber craft store, hosted a Sit and Stitch.  I contacted my fellow First Monday Crafters and some of us showed up to sit, knit, and enjoy the beautiful ambience of this local shop.  Ambience in this case can be read as “irresistible shopping opportunity”.

I had previously bought a beautiful big ball of Noro yarn from Humble Stitch and as I sat and chatted with the other knitters, I worked on a cowl. I hope the temps will go down at some point, so I can wear it.  I even gave in to the urge and bought another similar ball of Noro in a different color wave to make another cowl. 

My maternal grandmother taught me to knit when I was eight years old.  That was very many years ago.  Although I’ve been knitting for decades, I am not an expert knitter.  I don’t want to knit intricate patterns with lots of color changes. I find the act of knitting to be relaxing and meditative and I like to keep it low key.

This past week I drew up a design for the next installment in my Mother Earth Speaks series of hooked pieces.  I need to live with it for a while before committing it to linen, wool, and hook.  This series explores both natural and man-made ecological disasters.  This next one will be a natural near-disaster to those living on the coast of Greenland.  That’s all I’ll say on it for now.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the communal sharing of fiber art.

Noro  yarn on the needles.

Noro yarn on the needles.

I just can't stop!

I finished hooking my Barn Owl with Moon2 rug this past week.  I was going to wait to bind it at the Brandywine Hook-In later this month, but I. Could. Not. Wait.  I actually love finishing rugs, so the desire to hold off was overwhelmed by the desire to bind and whip the edge.  I guess I’ll have to find something else to hook at the hook-in.

There’s a spot on my kitchen floor that has been waiting for this rug, so that, coupled with the fact that I will be hosting my Breakfast Club ladies in a couple of weeks, really gave me an irresistible urge to get this rug done and down.

What’s next?  I will be hooking my new design, Harvest Moon, in the near future, but I need something else in the meantime.  Maybe another piece for my Mother Earth Speaks series?  I do have a few ideas bubbling around in my head for that.  I’ll see what grabs me.

Autumn is here at Crow's Foot Farm, but the temps are still a bit too mild.  I hope your autumn is beautiful where you are.

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in having a new rug for my kitchen floor.

Barn Owl with Moon2 in situ.

Barn Owl with Moon2 in situ.

I whipped the edge with two strands of wool, one charcoal grey and one burgundy.

I whipped the edge with two strands of wool, one charcoal grey and one burgundy.

 

Pumpkin palette.

My Barn Owl with Moon rug is almost finished.  An autumnal design gets me excited and my hook flying.  This rug, which is 24” x 36”, is hooked mostly in #8.5 cut wool strips for the pumpkin and background, and #8 and #7 for the other design elements.

Orange is one of my favorite colors.  It’s my Power Color and signifies Creative Energy to me.  I used about ten different orange and orange-related wools for this pumpkin.  I also love to add pops of magenta in my orange pumpkins. Using an unexpected color in design elements adds excitement and moves the viewer’s eyes around the design.

Although I’ll be finished with hooking this rug by next week, I will hold off on the whipping of the edges until the Brandywine Hook-In in October.  Binding a rug at a hook-in can be done without lugging a frame, tub of wool, etc. I spend most of my time at a hook-in shopping, chatting, and looking at an array of rugs.  I confess that little actual hooking is done by me.

My next project will be my newest design called, Harvest Moon.  I’ll be hooking it for a friend, who is an artist who loves color.  I want to do some wool shopping at the Brandywine Hook-In for this new rug. 

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in the rich colors of an autumnal rug.

Barn Owl with Moon 24”x 36”

Barn Owl with Moon 24”x 36”

A close up of the many pumpkin colors used.

A close up of the many pumpkin colors used.

The orange wools used.

The orange wools used.

My next pumpkin pattern, Harvest Moon, 22” x 40”

My next pumpkin pattern, Harvest Moon, 22” x 40”

Progress and pumpkins.

I started hooking my Barn Owl with Moon-take 2 rug at Fort Hunter Day in Harrisburg PA a week ago. Good progress has been made thanks to using wide #8.5 cut wool strips for the background. The design elements are being hooked in #8 cut.  A border might be added, but I will wait to see how it looks when I finish what is drawn on the linen.

This past week, a friend asked me to design a pattern for her with pumpkins, a full moon, an owl, and vines and leaves - pretty much what I’m hooking now, but in a different size and no mice.  I worked up a design for her, which I’ve titled, Harvest Moon.  I’ll be hooking the same rug, too, so it’ll be fun to see how we each interpret it.  Although the pattern is not yet listed on the Shop page of my website, it is available for purchase by contacting me through the Contact page.

I don’t want to jinx anything, but the weather seems more autumnal recently. I am ready for cool days, pumpkins, fall leaves, apple cider, and earlier dark nights. Oh, and Halloween!

There’s a lot of beauty out there and in hooking fall rug patterns.

Barn Owl with Moon- take2 in progress.

Barn Owl with Moon- take2 in progress.